Friday, August 18, 2017


 Congregational Way
Minimize

Ordination to Ministry

(From the NACCC Web Page)

Ordination is, of necessity, by the local church.  Whenever a man or woman is to be ordained to Christian ministry in the Congregational Way, the basic steps are clear:

1.  The individual, in response to the call of God, seeks to be equipped for ministry (usually through the acquisition of a baccalaureate degree followed by a seminary degree).

2.  The church in which this person holds membership, after prayerful consideration, resolves to set this person apart for professional ministry;

3.  A letter missive is sent to neighboring churches inviting them by Pastor and delegate to convene as a Vicinage Council to advise with respect to the proposed actions of this local church.  While the advice of such neighbors has no power to cause that local church to change its actions, and while the local church retains the freedom to ordain whomever it chooses, churches are well advised to heed the counsel of the gathered ministers and delegates.  If the Council does not proceed to the ordination, or in the absence of a Council of the Vicinage, the ordination is recognized as valid for the initiating church only and has no standing in our wider fellowship, except as it relates to that local church - so great is our commitment to the realness of autonomy.

Ordination to Ministry

(From the NACCC Web Page)

Ordination is, of necessity, by the local church.  Whenever a man or woman is to be ordained to Christian ministry in the Congregational Way, the basic steps are clear:

1.  The individual, in response to the call of God, seeks to be equipped for ministry (usually through the acquisition of a baccalaureate degree followed by a seminary degree).

2.  The church in which this person holds membership, after prayerful consideration, resolves to set this person apart for professional ministry;

3.  A letter missive is sent to neighboring churches inviting them by Pastor and delegate to convene as a Vicinage Council to advise with respect to the proposed actions of this local church.  While the advice of such neighbors has no power to cause that local church to change its actions, and while the local church retains the freedom to ordain whomever it chooses, churches are well advised to heed the counsel of the gathered ministers and delegates.  If the Council does not proceed to the ordination, or in the absence of a Council of the Vicinage, the ordination is recognized as valid for the initiating church only and has no standing in our wider fellowship, except as it relates to that local church - so great is our commitment to the realness of autonomy.

Privacy Statement  |  Terms Of Use
Copyright 2010 by Congregational Christian Council of Maine